SAN FRANCISCO PRESERVATION BULLETIN NO. 5 LANDMARK AND HISTORIC DISTRICT DESIGNATION PROCEDURES Reviewed and adopted by the Landmarks Preservation Advisory Board on December 16, 1998. Revised and adopted by the Landmarks Preservation Advisory Board on April 4, 2001. DEFINITION A landmark may include any structure, landscape feature, site or area having historic, architectural, archaeological, cultural or aesthetic significance in the history of San Francisco, the State of California or the nation. Examples of local landmarks include such diverse structures as monumental as City Hall and the Ferry Building as well as small scaled, rare, surviving structures such as a Blacksmith Shop and a 1906 Refugee Shack. An historic district refers to any area containing a significant concentration of structures, landscape features, sites or objects having historic, architectural, archaeological, cultural or aesthetic significance which are contextually united. To date, the City has designated eleven historic districts representative of distinct periods of history, such as Jackson Square, which contains an extant concentration of commercial buildings from the 1850s and 1860s; Alamo Square, Telegraph Hill and Webster Street, representing various periods of domestic architecture; the South End and Northeast Waterfront warehouse districts; and Civic Center, with its grand Beaux Arts architecture and plan. JURISDICTION Designation of landmarks and historic districts in San Francisco is pursuant to the procedures set forth in Planning Code Section 1004. Article 10 seeks to preserve and protect cultural resources citywide and includes the City’s official list of properties that embody the architecture, history and cultural heritage of the City and County. All designated City Landmarks and Historic Districts are listed in the Appendices to Article 10 of the Planning Code. PURPOSE The purpose of these landmark and historic district procedures is to assist interested parties with the identification, nomination and designation of local landmarks and historic districts as significant cultural resources. More broadly, the purposes of all aspects of Article 10 of the Planning Code is to promote the health, safety and general welfare of the public through a variety of means including the protection, enhancement, perpetuation and use of structures, sites and areas that are reminders of past eras, events and persons, significant examples of architectural styles, or that provide examples of the physical surroundings in which past generations lived.
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2 The landmarks and historic districts are unique and irreplaceable assets to the City and its neighborhoods and provide examples of the physical surroundings in which past generations lived. Once identification and evaluation have occurred, the intent of such designations is to protect, preserve, enhance and encourage continued utilization, rehabilitation and, where necessary, adaptive use of significant cultural resources. INCENTIVES FOR DESIGNATION Preservation incentives may encourage the designation of cultural resources and offer benefits to property owners. Such incentives include federal tax credits for certified rehabilitations, property tax reduction through a Mills Act contract as well as preservation easements accepted by local and state preservation organizations. Designated cultural resources can utilize the State Historical Building Code (SHBC) as an alternative building code. Certain loans are available for the seismic retrofit of Unreinforced Masonry Buildings (UMBs), and HUD/Mayors Office of Housing grants are available to non-profit housing sponsors and small business owners for the rehabilitation of historic properties. Oftentimes, the designation of a cultural resource can affect the decision-making in the granting of a variance (e.g. off-street parking) or a conditional use authorization (e.g. a bed and breakfast within a landmark structure). In general, rehabilitation work is often less expensive than new development and has fewer adverse environmental impacts. For further information on historic preservation incentives in San Francisco, see Preservation Bulletin No. 6, Preservation Incentives. THE LANDMARK AND HISTORIC DISTRICT DESIGNATION PROCESS I. Initiation of Designation A landmark or historic district may be initiated, as described in Section 1004.1 of the Planning Code, by: • The Board of Supervisors; or • A resolution of intention by the Planning Commission, the Art Commission or the Landmarks Preservation Advisory Board (Landmarks Board); or • An application submitted by the owners of the property to be designated or their authorized agents. Property owners who wish to initiate designation of their property as a landmark shall file an application with the Planning Department (Department) upon forms prescribed by the Planning Commission accompanied by all data required by the Planning Commission. Where such an application is submitted by the owners of property for the designation of an historic district, the application must by subscribed to by or on behalf of a least 66 and 2/3 percent of the property owners in the proposed historic district. Non-owners would need to seek the assistance and support of the Boards or Commissions listed above to initiate the process of landmark designation. During public comment on non-agenda items members of the public may address a Board
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3 or Commission about a property they wish to promote for landmark initiation. If the Board or Commission is interested in exploring the landmark potential of that property they could calendar it for discussion at a future hearing. Once an application has been filed, or a resolution adopted to initiate designation of a landmark or historic district no application for a permit to construct, alter or demolish any structure or other feature on a landmark site, or in an historic district, shall be approved by the Planning Department while proceedings are pending on the designation, as described in Planning Code Section 1014. If final action on the designation has not been completed within 180 days of initiation, the permit application may be approved. II. Landmarks Board Recommendation A proposal to designate a Landmark or Historic District is outlined in Sections 1004.2 of the Planning Code. Ordinarily, the Landmarks Board reviews the proposal for its conformance with the purposes and standards of Article 10 at a public hearing. Although it is not required by the Planning Code, the Planning Department will notify the property owner(s) of the proposed hearing date and a Notice of the Meeting and Agenda of the Landmarks Board will be mailed to the owner(s) in advance of the Public Hearing. The Landmarks Board shall recommend approval, disapproval or modification of the proposed designation, resolution or application within thirty days after receipt of such referral and report its findings to the Planning Commission. If no such recommendation is rendered within that time period, the Planning Commission may act independently on the proposal. If the Landmarks Board supports a nomination for either a Landmark or an Historic District, it would: • Finalize the Landmark/Historic District Designation Report; and • Adopt a resolution that recommends to the Planning Commission designation of the resource as a Landmark or Historic District. The Landmarks Board may combine in one resolution both of its actions: the initiation of landmark designation and the recommendation of designation to the Planning Commission. If the Landmarks Board does not find that the resource(s) merit designation, it shall report its recommendation or modification of the proposal or disapproval action to the Planning Commission. The Landmarks Board meets the first and third Wednesday of each month generally after noon at City Hall, 1 Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place, Room 400. Call 558-6320 on the Friday afternoon preceding the Wednesday meeting for a notice of the meeting and agenda of the Landmarks Board.
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4 III. Planning Commission Action The hearing process before the Planning Commission is described in Section 1004.3 of the Planning Code. The owners of all property included in the designation are notified by mail ten days in advance of a proposed public hearing at the Planning Commission and an advertisement is placed in a local newspaper not less than 20 days in advance of the Planning Commission hearing with a detailed description of the proposal. The Planning Commission generally meets every Thursday at 1:30 p.m. in Room 400, City Hall, 1 Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place. The Planning Commission shall consider the report of the Landmarks Board and shall consider the conformance or lack of conformance of the proposed designation with the purposes and standards of Article 10 of the Planning Code. The Planning Commission shall approve, disapprove or modify the proposal within 90 days after the conclusion of the public hearing; failure to act within said time frame shall constitute approval. A. Designation If the Planning Commission approves or modifies the proposed designation in whole or in part, it shall transmit the proposal together with a copy of the resolution of approval to the Clerk of the Board of Supervisors. B. Appeals If the Planning Commission disapproves the nomination, any governmental body or agency, a recognized preservation organization, or an owner may appeal the Planning Commission’s decision to the Board of Supervisors within 30 days of the Planning Commission’s decision. The owners of at least 20 percent of the property(ies) proposed for designation may also submit a protest. If the Board of Supervisors initiated the proposal, the Clerk of the Board shall be notified immediately of the disapproval action of the Planning Commission. IV. Board of Supervisors Actions Upon receipt of the Planning Commission’s determination, a subcommittee of the Board of Supervisors schedules a public hearing on the item(s). The Committee can recommend to the full Board of Supervisors either approval, disapproval or modification of the designation. To inquire which subcommittee the landmark designation has been referred to call the Clerk of the Board at 554-5184. The Board of Supervisors meets each Tuesday at 2 p.m. in the Board of Supervisors Chambers, City Hall, 1 Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place. A first and second reading and vote on the ordinance occurs at the full Board of Supervisors. Their adoption of an ordinance for the Landmark/Historic District is based upon a majority vote of all its members. The ordinance is then transmitted to the Mayor for signature. A Landmark or Historic District becomes effective 30 days after the Mayor signs the ordinance. The Department is responsible for recording the ordinance locally at the Recorder’s
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5 Office and the recordation is mailed to the property owner(s). The Department of Building Inspection (DBI) and the Assessor’s Office are also notified once the designation is finalized and the City’s records are updated to reflect the landmark/historic district designation. Generally, it takes four to six months to complete all of the above-described steps after a Landmark/Historic District Designation Report is finalized. Once a landmark and/or an historic district is initiated, the Department has the obligation to hold in abeyance any permit filed thereafter that seeks to construct, alter or demolish any structure or feature on a landmark site for a period of up to 180 days. The process is outlined in Planning Code Section 1014. RECOGNITION OF STRUCTURES OF MERIT, SECTION 1011 Article 10 provides a mechanism to recognize a secondary category of landmarks that are known as Structures of Merit. The purpose of this list is to recognize and encourage the protection, enhancement, perpetuation and use of structures that are not officially designated as landmarks and are not situated in designated historic districts. Over the past thirty years, the City has recognized nine Structures of Merit. The Planning Commission, acting on the advice of the Landmarks Board, is empowered to recognize, establish and maintain a list of Structures of Merit. The Landmarks Board as well as the Planning Commission shall adopt a resolution recognizing a Structure of Merit at the Regular Meetings of both public bodies. Structures of Merit do not require Board of Supervisors approval. Project sponsors should utilize the Landmark/Historic District Designation Report forms for proposed Structures of Merit. Additionally, pursuant to Section 1011, the Landmarks Board and the Planning Commission shall maintain a record of cultural resources in the City that have been officially designated and are recognized by state and federal agencies and shall add Structures of Merit to that list. The regulations and controls of Article 10 are not imposed on Structures of Merit. APPLICATION REVIEW STANDARDS National Register Criteria and the Evaluation Process San Francisco contains many older buildings that contribute to the overall architectural, aesthetic and urban design qualities of the City, in varying degrees. Some buildings are important solely based on their individual design attributes; others derive their worth for the history of their owners, occupants and uses. Others may be significant more for their contextual association with surrounding properties. Buildings proposed for preservation may include both those of individual importance and those which taken as a whole are considered to be contributory elements to a neighborhood or district. These latter buildings define a streetscape and create a congruous whole. The Purposes Section of Article 10 of the Planning Code (Code) contains general language about the protection, enhancement, perpetuation and use of structures, sites and areas that may be significant to local, state or national history. Section 1004 of the Code requires that a landmark designation include: • The boundaries of the landmark site;
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6 • The characteristics that justify its designation; and • A description of the particular features that should be preserved. The Code does not contain specific criteria on how to survey, identify, evaluate and document cultural resources. Consequently, the Landmarks Board recognized the need to adopt a uniform system to evaluate cultural resources once they are identified. To that end, in June 2000, the Landmarks Board adopted by Resolution 527, the Secretary of Interior's Standards1 and the California State Office of Historic Preservation Recordation Manual2(DPR 523 series) for use in Landmark and Historic District Designation Reports and nominations, and Structures of Merit nominations under Article 10 of the Planning Code. The following four National Register Criteria (reprinted from 36CFR60.4) are designed to guide applicants, the Landmarks Board and the Planning Commission in evaluating historic properties: “The quality of significance in American history, architecture, archeology, engineering, and culture is present in districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects that possess integrity of location, design, setting, materials, workmanship, feeling, and association, and: A that are associated with events that have made a significant contribution to the broad patterns of our history; or B that are associated with the lives of persons significant in our past; or C that embody the distinctive characteristics of a type, period, or method of construction, or that represent the work of a master, or that possess high artistic values, or that represent a significant and distinguishable entity whose components may lack individual distinction; or D that have yielded, or may be likely to yield, information important in prehistory or history.” Individual landmarks may be evaluated with a historic context. A historic context is, by definition, an organizational framework that groups information about related historic properties based on a theme, geographical area, and period of time. Knowledge of historic contexts may help to identify themes of local as well as state importance and may strengthen the basis for evaluating the significance of properties identified during survey. In turn, survey results may help to augment, refine, and revise historic contexts and preservation priorities. The Landmarks Board has adopted a number of such contexts that are kept on file with the Planning Department. EARLY READS FROM STAFF AND/OR THE LANDMARKS BOARD 1 Secretary of the Interior's Standards and Guidelines for Archeology and Historic Preservation. 2 Instructions for Recording Historical Resources, DPR 523 Series Forms, published by the California Office of Historic Preservation, March 1995 or consecutive revisions thereto. The manual makes use of the National Register Criteria for evaluating resources and reprints them in its Appendix 7.
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7 If, prior to filing a Landmark/Historic District Designation Application, an applicant wants to have an “early read” of his/her proposal or to otherwise seek advice before filing, the Planning Department recommends that the owner/project sponsor request a Project Review Meeting. These sessions are scheduled on a weekly basis with Department staff. In unusual circumstances, particularly for a proposal to consider designation of a cultural resource less than fifty years of age or for a proposal to designate a large historic district, the applicant(s) may also request an Informational Presentation before the Landmarks Board. APPLICATION REVIEW PROCESS AND TIMING Once an application for a Landmark and/or Historic District is received by the Planning Department, it is reviewed for completeness through the intake process and assigned a case number. The applicant will be notified in a timely manner if additional documentation is required. When the application is determined complete, a duly noticed public hearing is scheduled at the Landmarks Board per Code Section 1004.1.
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8 City And County of San Francisco (L) Landmarks Preservation Advisory Board Application for inclusion to Article 10 of the Planning Code; Preservation of Historical, Architectural and Aesthetic Landmarks I. Location and Classification Property Address:______________________________Block/Lot:____________ Name:___________________________________________________________ If the property is identified in the Planning Department’s Historic Resource Database, please indicate the survey (s) and ratings. Also list any state or federal listings II. Owner / Applicant Information *Property Owners Name:______________________________________________________ Address:_________________ Zip:________ Telephone: ______________ Applicant’s Name:______________________________________________________ Address:_________________ Zip:________ Telephone: ______________ Contact for Project information:__________________________________________________ Address:_________________ Zip:________ Telephone: ______________ * In the case of multiple property owners, please attach Assessor’s Office listing of the owner’s as well as letters of authorization. Historic Districts require 66 the owners III. Attachments: Landmark Designation Report [ ] District Designation Report [ ] Structure of Merit [ ] Planning Department Fee (Per Planning Code Section 356) [ ] IV. Applicant’s Affidavit Under penalty of perjury I, the applicant, declare that I am the owner or authorized agent of the owner (s) of this property; and that the information presented is true and correct to the best of my knowledge. Signed:_____________________________ Date:_____________________ _____________________________
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9 (Print Name of Applicant in Full)
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10 APPLICATION SUBMITTAL REQUIREMENTS A Landmark/Historic District Designation Report may be prepared by an owner or by an owner’s authorized agent and/or consultant, by Planning Department staff, by Landmarks Board members, by another governmental body or by a non-profit preservation organization such as San Francisco Architectural Heritage or the Victorian Alliance. In order to schedule a meeting with the Landmarks Board to discuss a proposed landmark and/or historic district nomination, the following information is required: A completed Landmark / Historic District Designation Application Form(Attached to this document, also available at the Planning Information Center counter.) A completed Landmark / Historic District Designation Report (See Appendix A – Landmark / Historic District Report Template.) Note: One original plus 22 copies are needed. Individual landmark nominations must have an accompanying State of California DPR 523A and 523B recordation forms. The DPR 523A or Primary Recorddocuments the physical aspects of an historic site while the DPR 523B or Building, Structure, Object Record form evaluates a resource. (One original plus 22 copies.) For Historic Districts, a building-by-building Inventory for every parcel identified within the historic district is required. A map of the district is also required. Use State of California DPR 523A and 523B forms to document and evaluate the properties. (One original plus 22 copies.) For Historic Districts, a Context Statement. (One original plus 22 copies.) A Letter of Authorization from the property owner(s) or sponsoring organization or a resolution adopted by the initiating Board or Commission. (One original.) Photos (One set of original black and white prints for Department archives of both current and historic, if available, plus 22 sets of photocopies.) Sanborn Maps (One set of both current and historic, if available.) Mailing Labels (two sets of adhesive backed labels for mailing agendas and Landmarks Board decisions to the property owner, applicant and/or project sponsor and interested parties). A check payable to the Planning Department based upon the fee schedule listed in Section 356 of the Planning Code [Note: a fee is required if the application is filed by property owner(s)].
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11 LANDMARK / HISTORIC DISTRICT DESIGNATION REPORT TEMPLATE Fill in all blanks in the Landmark / Historic District Designation Report Template presented below. The template is annotated with the notes in italic print to guide responses. Write responses with caps and lower case letters, do not use bold font. Repeat box header and appropriate page number for all subsequent pages. LANDMARK DESIGNATION REPORT LANDMARKS BOARD VOTE(Staff)DATE: (Submission Date) APPROVED:(Assigned by Staff)CASE NO.: (Assigned by Staff)PLANNING COMMISSION VOTE:(Staff)APPROVED:(Staff)PAGE 1 of 1 (Number Consecutively) PROPOSED LANDMARK NO.:(Staff)HISTORIC NAMEIf known state either the formal name for the resource during its period of significance or a name closely associated with its significance.POPULAR NAMEThe common or presently used name for the resource. ADDRESSThe postal address if any of the resourceBLOCK & LOTThe Assessor’s parcel number (available from the Planning Department)OWNERList all current owners of a property with at least 10% interest in the property. ORIGINAL USEThe original use of the property.CURRENT USEIdentify the present use(s) of the property. Past uses may be identified in the statement of significance.ZONINGState the current zoning of the property including height and any special use districts that may apply to the property. NATIONAL REGISTER CRITERIA Check all National Register criteria applicable to the significance of the property that are then documented in the report. The criteria checked is (are) the basic justification for whythe resource is important. (A)___ Association with events that have made a significant contribution to the broad patterns of our history. (B)___ Association with the lives of persons significant in our past. (C)___ Embody distinctive characteristics of a type, period, or method of construction, or that represent a significant and distinguishable entity whose components may lack individual distinction. (D)___ Has yielded, or may be likely to yield information important in history or prehistory. Period of SignificanceThis refers to a range of dates or period of time as it relates to the historical context and the National Register criteria checked above. IntegrityDescribe how the resource possesses integrity of location, design, setting, materials, workmanship, feeling, and association. Highlight alterations that have occurred to the resource, that are explained in depth under the Description section
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12 of the report.ARTICLE 10 REQUIREMENTS SECTION 1004 (b) Boundaries of the Landmark SiteProvide a written description, for example: Encompassing all of and limited to Lot 50 in Assessor's Block 2864; and/or a graphic example: Exhibit A, Assessor's Map _____. Characteristics of the landmark that justify its designationA descriptive summary of the physical characteristics present, if any, at the site in terms of the National Register criteria checked above that justify local landmark status. Description of the particular features that should be preserved Related to the Characteristics, describe in detail all the features present that are key to maintaining the significance of the landmark site. In some instances, a reverse approach may be effective; create a list that exempts the non-contributing features from the landmark designation. This section is important for guiding future Landmarks Board decisions on potential alterations to the landmark site. DESCRIPTION Copy the text description of the resource from the DPR 523A form, inserting photographs with the text. Follow the Instructions For Recording Historical Resources Manual instructions.STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCECopy the text statement of significance of the resource provided in the DPR 523B form. Follow the Instructions For Recording Historical Resources Manual instructions. CROSS STREET REFERENCE MAPProvide a copy of the property map and adjacent streets provided in the DPR 523B form.REFERENCESProvide a detailed list of all bibliographic references and sources for research that contributed to the nomination as a whole. For primary research and unpublished documents, list also the repository where they can be found. You may use a standard format such as can be found in The Chicago Manual of Style for your references. RATINGSList all prior surveys that include the property. (e.g. National Register listing)PREPARED BYProvide the name of person(s) who authored and/or filed the report.ADDRESSContact information for the person(s) who prepared the nomination.ATTACHMENTSCheck all that apply. 523A___, 523B___, 523L (continuation sheets)___, Context Statement___, Other_________________
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13 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION REQUIRED FOR A HISTORIC DISTRICT NOMINATION 1. Identify and Document a Historic Context(s) The Secretary of the Interior's standards and guidelines for Archeology and Historic Preservation, specifically The Secretary of the Interior’s Guidelines for Preservation Planning3offer the following steps for documenting a historic context: a. Identification. Identify the concept (or theme), chronological period, and geographical area for the historic context. b. Assemble information about the historic context. • Collect information about the prehistory or history of the geographical area encompassed by the historic context, including information about properties that have already been identified. Identify groups of properties that may have important roles in defining historic contexts and values. • Assess information to identify bias in historic perspective, methodological approach, or area of coverage. c. Synthesize information. Prepare a written narrative of the historic context, providing a detailed synthesis of the data collected and analyzed. Important patterns, events, persons, architectural types and styles, or cultural values should be identified. Consider: • Trends in area settlement and development; • Aesthetic and artistic values embodied in architecture, construction, technology, or craftsmanship, and • Research values. d. Define property types. • Identify property types that have relevance and importance in illustrating the historic context. Determine how the National Register criteria would apply to examples of each, based on the important patterns, events, persons, and cultural values discussed in the written narrative of historic context. Also, outline and justify the specific physical and associative characteristics and quality of historic integrity that an individual property must possess to be eligible for listing as a member of the property type. • Characterize the locational patterns of property types, that is, generalize about where particular types of property are likely to be found. • Characterize the current condition of known properties relating to each property type. 3 Historic Contexts are also discussed in greater detail in National Register Bulletin 16B, How to Complete the National Register Multiple Property Documentation Form.
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14 2. Building-by-Building Inventory For proposed historic districts, a building-by-building Inventory is required for each-and-every parcel contained within the boundaries of the proposed historic district. Use the State of California DPR 523A and DPR 523B recordation forms to complete the inventory. The forms can be downloaded from: http://ohp.parks.ca.gov/chris/publicat.htm3. PhotosProvide a few black and white photos of streetscapes that convey the feeling of the proposed district. Historic photos of the historic district and of key buildings are also helpful. 4. Base MapA base map that delineates the boundaries of the proposed historic district is an essential element of the submittal. Department Staff can assist in defining the precise limits or edges of a proposed historic district. Oftentimes, the boundaries of historic district result from an inherent relationship of natural and man made features. References:Other sources of information on how to prepare and document a proposed historic district nomination are: National Register Bulletin No.16A, “How to Complete the National Register Registration Form”; National Register Bulletin No. 16B, “How to Complete the National Register Multiple Property Documentation Form”; and State of California, Office of Historic Preservation, “Instructions for Recording Historical Resources.”
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15 HOW TO DOCUMENT A BUILDING’S HISTORY In order to review a landmark/historic district nomination, the Landmarks Board requires a Statement of Significance and supporting background material that justify the nomination. Outlined below are some of the steps required to do research and a partial listing of the local resources available to applicants/project sponsors. Appendix C lists General Reference Sources. These steps and resources can substantially aid individuals and interested parties preparing a Landmark/Historic District Designation Report. 1. Address, Block/Lot Obtain all address(es) and lot(s)/block(s) of the properties proposed for designation, then go to the Water Department at 425 Mason Street to check the original Water Tap turn-on applications which list the date of connections to buildings. These records may reveal the original owner, architect/builder and date of construction. Because the records are fragile and not readily available, it is suggested that researchers use the microfiche of these records at the San Francisco Main Library. 2. Building Permits The Department of Building Inspection (DBI) Records Management Division, located at 1680 Mission Street, maintains original building permits, post 1906 earthquake and fire, on microfiche for the City. Research on building permit history on microfiche can also be undertaken in the Microfilm Section of the Department of Building Inspection at 1660 Mission Street, First Floor at (415) 558-6080. The Housing Inspection Services (HIS) located at 1660 Mission Street, 6th Floor of the DBI at (415) 558-6220 maintains housing inspection records of all apartment buildings and hotels in the City. 3. Sales Records The City and County of San Francisco, Office of the Assessor-Recorder at City Hall, 1 Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place, has records about owners and the actual room counts of buildings as well as information about the estimated date of construction. Sales ledgers from 1906 to 1990 and Block books from 1913-1976 are on microfiche. Building contract notices to the general record, as well as building completion notices to the general record, extant from 1906 to the present may be helpful. Deeds of property transactions located in an Index of Real Estate Transfers from 1906 to the present, as well as Map Books from 1846 to the present, Subdivision and Homestead Maps from 1850 to the present are also available for review. All of these resources can be of use in the research and documentation process. 4. Primary ResearchThe San Francisco History Room and other departments of the main branch of the Public Library are excellent resources for primary research on a landmark and/or an historic district nomination. Reference materials include: Block books; block profiles of the entire City; Business Directories; the California and Architect and Building News (1897 to 1900); the California Builder; Edwards Abstracts; Here Today; Junior League research files; Municipal Reports; a Photo Collection (by street name); Real Estate Circulars; Edwards Abstracts (1906 to 1977), San Francisco, Our Society Blue Books (1890-1931), Handy Block Books of San Francisco, the Index to the Great
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16 Register of Voter Records, (1900 to 1928). Other resources include Historic Photographs, Sanborn Maps, Newspapers, the Biographical Index Cards, the Daily Pacific Builder, the Architect and Engineer (1905 to 1945), Western Architecture and Engineering (1945 to 1961), the Gary Goss Index of the Architect and Engineer (1905 to 1928) and John Synder’s Index of the California Architect and Building News, as well as Anne Bloomfield’s description of How to Work with the 1906-1913 Sales ledgers, located in the Office of the Assessor-Recorder, City Landmark Case Reports and Water Department Tap Records which are on microfiche. The San Francisco Main Library also has a collection of Census Records and City Directories that are located on the sixth floor San Francisco History Room and City Archives. Other sources for information include: The National Archives 1000 Commodore Drive San Bruno CA (650) 876-9001 Rare Books and Family Histories Sutro Library of the California State Library San Francisco State University (415) 731-4477 The Labor Archives Sutro Library of the California State Library San Francisco State University (415) 564-4010 Bancroft Library University of California at Berkeley (510) 642-3781 Documents Collection College of Environmental Design, Wurster Hall, Room 232 University of California at Berkeley (510) 642-51245. Sanborn MapsFind and copy (or trace) or print from microfilm the earliest Sanborn Fire Insurance Map that shows evidence of the building’s existence. Sanborn Maps show block by block what buildings were built at various times throughout the City’s history. The 1886-1893, 1899-1900 and 1913-1914 Sanborn Maps are available in the San Francisco History Room of the Main Library in Civic Center. Sanborn Maps are also located within the Office of the Assessor-Recorder located at 1 Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place. The California Historical Society Library located at 678 Mission Street has an extensive collection on San Francisco and California history and artifacts including San Francisco Sanborn Maps. (Please note that the CHS Library is open on Wednesdays only from 10 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., by appointment). 6. Cultural Resources Database and Existing Survey InformationThe Planning Department maintains an extensive Cultural Resources
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17Database. It is integrated into the land use database of the City and contains existing survey information for the City. This database can assist applicants/project sponsors with some background material relevant to a proposed landmark/historic district nomination. The database contains summary information for all the designated individual City Landmarks as well the Historic Districts listed in Article 10 of the Planning Code. Some 435 individual buildings as well as six Conservation Districts that were designated as part of the Downtown Plan (Article 11) of the Planning Code are also listed. Buildings designated under other Area Plans of the General Plan of the City and County of San Francisco such as the South of Market, Chinatown, Rincon Hill and the Van Ness Area Plans are listed. Architectural resources contained in the Planning Department’s 1976 Citywide Survey (which identified over 10,000 buildings citywide) and the Board of Supervisors adopted book entitled Here Today (which contains survey information on over 2,500 buildings) are also listed. A thematic study of Unreinforced Masonry Buildings (UMBs) that identified approximately 2,000 buildings, (many of which were determined eligible for the National Register of Historic Places) are summarized in the Cultural Resources database. To date, approximately 3,500 buildings in San Francisco have been listed in or have been determined eligible for the National Register of Historic Places. The State Office of Historic Preservation maintains and updates periodically the California Register of Historical Resources and the National Register of Historic Places listings. The Northwest Information Center located at Sonoma State University in Rohnert Park; CA. (707-664-2494) can provide applicants/project sponsors with information on California Register and National Register listings for the City and County of San Francisco. Finally, a resource that appears in one or more of the above mentioned surveys might indicate that it is a potential landmark or a contributory building in an historic district. When a designation is being considered, existing survey information will be considered as one component in the overall evaluation of the resource. Lack of existing survey information does not mean the resource is not significant; it simply means that the resource or area has not been surveyed. Many of the City’s existing adopted surveys are now ten to thirty years old and are not standardized in terms of their format and content. A review, update and evaluation of the City’s cultural resources are underway and will take many years to complete. In general, the Northeastern quadrant of the City has the most survey work, much of which recognized pre-1930s buildings. As a general rule, resources that are worthy of preservation should be at least fifty years of age. National Register of Historic Places utilizes the fifty-year rule as a reasonable span of time that makes the professional evaluation of the resource feasible. In recent years, many properties in San Francisco have achieved significance due to the passage of time, (i.e. they are now fifty years of age or older). Research and evaluation on these undesignated resources may indicate that these properties are, in fact, landmark sites or contributory buildings to
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18historic districts. Many resources that are now fifty years of age or older may be significant on local, state or national levels. A thorough understanding of the architectural, historical, physical context of the resource and its integrity is essential in the evaluation of a resource that is either considered “exceptionally significant” (i.e., less than fifty years) or is now more fifty years of age and has not be surveyed.
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19GENERAL REFERENCE SOURCES A Companion to California by James D. Hart, Berkeley, CA., University of California Press, Second Edition, 1987. A Field Guide to American Houses by Virginia and Lee McAlester, New York, Alfred A. Knopf, 1986. Architecture in San Francisco and Northern California by David Gebhard, Roger Montgomery, Robert Winter, John Woodbridge and Sally Woodbridge, Salt Lake City, Peregrine Smith Books, 1985. Here Today, San Francisco’s Architectural Heritage. Text by Roger Olmsted and T. H. Watkins, San Francisco, CA., Chronicle Books, 1968. Historic City Directories and Census Records are located on the 5th Floor of the San Francisco Main Library, Civic Center. “How to Research Your San Francisco Building” by Jean Kortum, former Landmarks Board President and Member, Copyright 1992, Revised 1993 (Available at the Planning Department). “How to Complete the National Register Registration Form,” National Register Bulletin No. 16A (Available at the U.S. Government Printing Office, San Francisco, CA). “How to Complete the National Register Multiple Property Documentation Form,” National Register Bulletin No. 16B (Available at the U.S. Government Printing Office, San Francisco, CA). In the Victorian Style, Text by Randolph Delehanty, San Francisco, CA., Chronicle Books,1991. “Regulations for the Nomination of Properties to the California Register of Historical Resources”, Office of Historic Preservation, Sacramento, CA, May 31,1996. “Researching an Historic Property”, National Register Bulletin No. 39 (Available at the U.S. Government Printing Office, San Francisco, CA). The Ultimate Guide, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA., Chronicle Books, 1989. Splendid Survivors, San Francisco’s Downtown Architectural Heritage. Prepared by Charles Hall Page and Associates, Inc., for the Foundation for San Francisco’s Architectural Heritage, California Living Books, 1978. Street Address File, Biographical Index Cards, Landmark Case Reports and Historic Photographs are located in the San Francisco History Room, 6th Floor of the Main Library, Civic Center.
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20WEB SITES OF INTEREST Planning Department Homepage http://www.sfgov.org/planningCalifornia Office of Historic Preservation http://www.ohp.cal-parks.ca.govCalifornia DPR 523 Forms http://ohp.parks.ca.gov/chris/publicat.html National Register Homepage http://www.cr.nps.govNational Register Bulletins http://www.cr.nps.gov/nr/nrpubs.html January 2003
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